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Indicators of Respiratory Problems in Yorkies

    Preventive Care    July 22, 2014

Yorkies respiratory

Yorkshire terriers and other small breed dogs could experience respiratory problems. Small breeds usually suffer from tracheal collapse and reverse sneezing. It is difficult to distinguish between the two conditions because they have similar symptoms. Below are some indicators of respiratory problems in Yorkies.






You should first determine whether it is reverse sneezing or tracheal collapse. As you know, both conditions have similar symptoms. Tracheal collapse is more serious than reverse sneezing.

The trachea is the windpipe of the body and tracheal collapse is when the inner diameter of the windpipe narrows. This is common in middle-aged smaller breed dogs, such as a Yorkshire terrier.Yorkies respiratory

 

Some of the symptoms of tracheal collapse are:

  • Coughing
  • Hacking
  • Gagging
  • Wheezing
  • Loud breathing
  • Inability of the dog to exercise.

Yorkshire terriers that are obese have symptoms that are more severe.

Tracheal collapse has more dangerous symptoms. These include skin and gums that become bluish in color because of the lack of oxygen. It is a dangerous condition. The dog might also faint due to the depletion of oxygen. There are some dogs who don’t show any symptoms of the condition.

Tracheal collapse must be treated right away!

This includes protecting the dog from triggers such as extremes of humidity, cold and heat temperatures, and cigarette smoke. You can also use a harness instead of a collar. If the dog is obese, you should reduce the food intake. These precautions can help decrease chronic airway injury as well as coughing that are linked to the respiratory problem. In severe cases, emergency surgery is needed. You should consult your vet right away if you find unusual symptoms.

Reverse Sneezing is a common condition among small breed dogs and doesn’t need to be treated. The dog might need to extend his neck and the chest will expand as the dog tries to take in air but it should not be considered an emergency condition.

Photo by Caronna





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